Book Review — What Your Banker Won’t Tell You by Vaibhav Anand

Book Review — What Your Banker Won’t Tell You by Vaibhav Anand

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What Your Banker Won’t Tell You by Vaibhav Anand

Publisher: Srishti Publishers & Distributors
Pages: 26
Price: Rs. 26 INR(Kindle Edition)
ASIN: B087C445KM
Buy here: https://amzn.to/3cLL0iZ

Making money is hard, they will tell you. Or that you need to buy X insurance or Y mutual funds or a 3BHK in Z place. Your banker, your money manager, even the avuncular neighbour who sells you LIC policies, will seem incredibly earnest as they give you what is actually self-serving money advice.

Coming from someone who’s spent years in banking, ‘What your banker won’t tell you’ is a simple do-it-yourself guide for investing in India. Spanning investment instruments across real estate, mutual funds, equity investing, debt, gold, Vaibhav takes you through fundamental tenets and easy to follow steps to grow your money and keep your banker from taking some or almost all of it.

Read this book before you let your banker or LIC uncle mis-sell you something again.

About the author:

Vaibhav Anand is an author, poet, blogger and all round good guy. His qualifivations (the best sounding ones) include an MBA from FMS-Delhi, a degree in Chemical Engineering from the Delhi college of Engineering, a sizable number of contributions to Faking News and the ability to eat tandoori chicken dishes exceptionally fast. Aside from having written and published a few other books.

You can root for him and follow his ramblings and other misadventures on Twitter @vaibrainmaker or on his blog www.makingrain.blogspot.com

Alternately, if you are compelled to write a paean to his greatness that cannot be contained in 140 characters, you have the option of emailing it to him at vaibhav.a10@fms.edu. Do not use the words “Nigeria”, “Jackpot”, “Enlarge” or “Viagra” in you email or it will go directly to his spam folder.

He lives with his family, his quirks and his smartphones in his personal fortress in Delhi, guarded by a pack of particularly loyal and rather ferocious street dogs.

He also likes particularly referring to himself in the third person, like a lot of people now seem to do on Linkedin. He hopes this is the start of a trend and the first person in the English language is abolished forever.

My take on the book:

What your banker won’t tell you is a concise guide with rules to smart investing of money and hence wealth creation. The book address six topics at a broad level, and majorly jots down the pros and cons of the major investment options available. These include simple and risk free invest options, comparison between gold vs fixed deposits, stock markets, buying property as an investment, mutual funds and the invisible rules to it.

At 26 pages, this is a short and quick read and is apt for beginners as it provides them a general direction when starting out with investment. I liked that the author upfront warns that investment and wealth generation cannot happen if the individual does not save enough. In short, he does not give wrong hope that wealth can be generated from thin air.

Also, instead of using complex jargon, the author explains each of these investment options in simple terms, with good examples that are relatable to even novice readers. The author has years of experience to back his research and conclusions on which option is better than the other. A good pick for beginners in the investment world.

My rating:

3/5.

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